Friday, July 28, 2017

ALMOST HALF OF MILKY WAY'S MATTER MAY COME FROM DISTANT GALAXIES


 In a study by researchers at Northwestern University and elsewhere, it has been found that up to 50% of the matter in our galaxy may have come from extragalactic sources. This is contrary to previous understandings of how galaxies are created and evolve over time.
 Using supercomputer simulations, the scientists discovered the new mode in which galaxies, like our Milky Way, acquire their matter - intergalatic transfer. In the simulations, it was shown that supernova explosions eject copious amounts of gas from galaxies, causing atoms to be transported from one galaxy to another via powerful galactic winds.
 "Given how much of the matter out of which we formed may have come from other galaxies, we could consider ourselves space travelers or extragalactic immigrants,” said astrophysicist Dr. Daniel AnglĂ©s-Alcázar of Northwestern University.
 “It is likely that much of the Milky Way’s matter was in other galaxies before it was kicked out by a powerful wind, traveled across intergalactic space and eventually found its new home in the Milky Way.” However, given the incredible distances between galaxies, this process occurred over several billion years.
Read more about this fascinating story at: http://www.sci-news.com/astronomy/milky-ways-matter-extragalactic-origin-05077.html
Photo: Milky Way over Devils Tower by David Kingham via Flickr

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